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Pheochromocytoma

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Pheochromocytoma
Pathology
Type

Neuroendocrine tumor: cancer

Cause(s)

Numerous

Symptoms

Skin sensations, flank pain, elevated heart rate, diaphoresis, headaches, palpitations, etc.

Mortality Rate

High

Treatments

Radiation therapy, laparotomy, surgery

Show Information
Appearances

Acceptance

  [Source]


A phaeochromocytoma (PCC) or pheochromocytoma, is a neuroendocrine tumor of the medulla of the adrenal glands (originating in the chromaffin cells), or extra-adrenal chromaffin tissue that failed to involute after birth and secretes excessive amounts of catecholamines, usually adrenaline and noradrenaline. Extra-adrenal paragangliomas (often described as extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas) are closely related, though less common, tumors that originate in the ganglia of the sympathetic nervous system and are named based upon the primary anatomical site of origin. It appears in the episode Acceptance.

Symptoms Edit

The signs and symptoms of a pheochromocytoma are those of sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity, including:

- Skin Sensations

- Flank Pain

- Elevated heart rate

- Elevated blood pressure, including paroxysmal (sporadic, episodic) high blood pressure, which sometimes can be more difficult to detect; another clue to the presence of pheochromocytoma is orthostatic hypotension (a fall in systolic blood pressure greater than 20 mmHg or a fall in diastolic blood pressure greater than 10 mmHg on making the patient stand)

- Palpitations

- Anxiety often resembling that of a panic attack

- Diaphoresis

- Headaches

- Pallor

- Weight loss


























stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors leads to glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis and thus elevation of blood glucose levels).


A pheochromocytoma can also cause resistant arterial hypertension. A pheochromocytoma can be fatal if it causes malignant hypertension, or severely high blood pressure. This hypertension is not well controlled with standard blood pressure medications.

Not all patients experience all of the signs and symptoms listed. The most common presentation is headache, excessive sweating, and increased heart rate, with the attack subsiding in less than one hour.

Tumors may grow very large, but most are smaller than 10 cm.

Diagnosis Edit

The diagnosis can be established by measuring catecholamines and metanephrines in plasma or through a 24-hour urine collection. Care should be taken to rule out other causes of adrenergic (adrenalin-like) excess like hypoglycemia, stress, exercise, and drugs affecting the catecholamines like stimulants, methyldopa, dopamine agonists, or ganglion blocking antihypertensives. Various foodstuffs (e.g. vanilla ice cream) can also affect the levels of urinary metanephrine and VMA (vanillylmandelic acid). Imaging by computed tomography or a T2 weighted MRI of the head, neck, and chest, and abdomen can help localize the tumor. Tumors can also be located using Iodine-131 meta-iodobenzylguanidine (I131 MIBG) imaging.

Treatment Edit

Surgical resection of the tumor is the treatment of first choice, either by open laparotomy or else laparoscopy. Given the complexity of perioperative management, and the potential for catastrophic intra and postoperative complications, such surgery should be performed only at centers experienced in the management of this disorder. In addition to the surgical expertise that such centers can provide, they will also have the necessary endocrine and anesthesia resources. It may also be necessary to carry out adrenalectomy, a complete surgical removal of the affected adrenal gland(s).

Either surgical option requires prior treatment with the non-specific and irreversible alpha adrenoceptor blocker Phenoxybenzamine. Doing so permits the surgery to proceed while minimizing the likelihood of severe intraoperative hypertension (as might occur when the tumor is manipulated). Some authorities would recommend that a combined alpha/beta blocker such as labetalol also be given in order to slow the heart rate. Regardless, a "pure" beta blocker such as atenolol must never be used in the presence of a pheochromocytoma due to the risk of such treatment leading to unopposed alpha agonism and, thus, severe and potentially refractory hypertension.

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